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Video 1: Westinghouse Boasts 1951 Hi-Tech TV Innovation
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Video 2: "Mr. Wizard" Demonstrates Evolution Of Video For G.E.
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Invasion Of The Super Duper Advanced TVs In 1951, far outdistanced by RCA Victor, Admiral and Du Mont, Westinghouse and Philco entered a race as to who could make a TV set not based as much on electronic science as hype. Both claimed perfect reception with a "built in" antenna (nothing more than twin lead wiring wrapped around the cabinet) which, they claimed, would replace outdoor masts and indoor "rabbit ears." Of course, they couldn't, except if one lived right next to the station transmitters. Both claimed "advanced" circuitry, in truth, both chintzed on the vacuum tube count and quality of components (capacitors, resistors and transformers). This to bring to stores low priced sets. Can you guess? They had very short life spans and, because of overdriving cheaper components, made the repair services busy for those who even bothered to get the cheapie-TV fixed. (More...)

Ironically, both used cutsie all American girls, little and not so, in hooped skirts to show mommy and daddy how easy it was to twist the dials. Brands, Philco (the first), Andrea, Capehart and Stromberg-Carlson, came out in the early 60's with picture tubes that could be carried (with high voltage cables attached) separately from the controls and speaker, for whatever reason. Consumers weren't impressed. The sets were less than exquisite looking in any decor.

Think today's Sony batteries were the first exploding electronics? Zenith, in the late 60's, came out with vacuum tube "instant on" TV. A few home fires ended that not too bright idea.

Now, as all today's "branding,"the Westinghouse and Philco names are slapped on the similar Asian imported TV sets (same ic's, different cosmetics) sold at our favorite department store. (Mext: Top 10 Reasons To Kick Your TV

TOP TEN REASONS YOU'D KICK YOUR 50's-60's ERA TV SET

10. LOUSY RECEPTION DURING THE SHOW:
Little Bobby broke the rabbit ears

9. ONE ELECTRON VACUUM TUBE OR ANOTHER BLEW OUT ONCE A MONTH
Uncle Harry bought the wrong tube no's 6AV6, not 6AU6!, or defective used ones

8. THE SET OVERHEATED & BLEW UP ON A 90 DEGREE NIGHT
Grandpa blew the hot air reviewing the shows.

7. YOUR SET WAS IN THE SHOP BECAUSE IT NEEDED A NEW PICTURE TUBE.
The repair guy, who looked like Al Capone, wanted $250 to being the chasis back.
You paid your nephew ten bucks to go behind the screen with mustache, glasses & cigar.

5. SUNDAY NIGHT, THE STONES WERE ON ED SULLIVAN. MICK'S JUMPING ...SO'S THE PICTURE ON THE SET
You turn the Horizontal Control knob left and right, the picture still jumps up and down
So do you.

4. DIATHERMY (WAVEY BARS) INTERFERENCE CAME ON WHEN THE LOCAL HOSPITAL USED THEIR X-RAY MACHINES
One Tuesday night in Montclair, NJ, Diathermy 8PM to 11PM. Med Techs left the X-Ray on after the last patient left;
You were trying to watch "Dr. Kildaire" or "Ben Casey."

3. WORLD SERIES SUNDAY: YOUR NEIGHBOR'S KID FLIES HIS PLANE INTO YOUR ROOF ANTENNA>
He cries, "My plane!" You cry, "My Yankees!"

2. IT'S THE FINAL EPISODE OF "THE FUGITIVES"
All seven TV stations pre-empt programming for Ike's 750th Presidential Address
You know where you'd like to stuff the one armed man's other arm.

1. YOU FIND A MOUSE CAUSING A SHORT CIRCUIT INSIDE THE BACK OF YOUR TV.
You ask the two toothed rodent what he's doing there. He sez. "It's a Westinghouse, wight? So I'm westing."

About "Mr. Wizard," Don Herbert Don Herbert, born Donald Jeffrey Herbert Kemske on July 10, 1917, better known as Mr. Wizard, was an American television personality. He hosted two television shows about science aimed at children.

Herbert was a general science and English major at the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse (then called La Crosse State Normal College) who was interested in drama. His career as an actor was interrupted by World War II when he enlisted in the United States Army as a Private. Herbert later joined the United States Army Air Forces took pilot training and became a B-24 bomber pilot who flew 56 combat missions from Italy with the 767th Bomb Squadron, 461st Bomb Group of the Fifteenth Air Force. When Herbert was discharged in 1945 he was a Captain and had earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters.

After the war Herbert worked at a radio station in Chicago where he acted in children's programs such as the documentary health series It's Your Life (1949). It was during this time that Herbert formulated the idea of Mr. Wizard and a general science experiments show that used the new medium of television. Herbert's idea was accepted by Chicago NBC station WNBQ and the series Watch Mr. Wizard premiered on March 3, 1951. The weekly half hour show, co-produced by Jules Power,[3] featured Herbert as Mr. Wizard, with a young boy and girl who watched while Herbert performed interesting science experiments.[4] The experiments, many of which seemed impossible at first glance, were usually simple enough to be re-created by viewers. Each show ended the same way: with an experiment that somehow displayed the letters "FCMBB", which Mr. Wizard reminded us stood for "Fruit, Cereal, Milk, Bread and Butter, the five elements of a healthy breakfast." The show was very successful. 547 live episodes were created before it was canceled in 1965. Herbert won a Peabody Award for his work on the program in 1953.[5]

In the mid 1950s Herbert also appeared on the General Electric Theater as the "General Electric Progress Reporter" and would introduce spokesman Ronald Reagan and his family to the viewing audience. In some episodes he would appear alongside Reagan and demonstrate to the audience how General Electric was helping people to, "Live better electrically."

After his show was canceled Herbert produced films for junior and senior high schools, wrote several books on science and in 1969 developed a Mr. Wizard Science Center located outside Boston, Massachusetts. (The center no longer exists.)

The show was briefly revived in the 1971–1972 season as Mr. Wizard, produced in Canada by CJOH-TV in Ottawa; this series was seen on NBC as well as CBC Television in Canada. In 1982, Don Herbert was a guest on the first episode of Late Night with David Letterman.

In 1983 Herbert developed Mr. Wizard's World, a faster-paced version of his show that was shown three times a week on the cable channel Nickelodeon. The show ran until 1990 and reruns were shown until 2000.

In 1993 children's science show Beakman's World paid homage to Herbert by naming its two penguin puppet characters "Don" and "Herb" after him. Then, in 1994 Herbert developed another new series of 15-minute spots called Teacher to Teacher with Mr. Wizard. The spots highlighted individual elementary science teachers and their projects. The series was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and was shown on Nickelodeon.

Don Herbert died of Multiple Myeloma on June 12, 2007, four weeks before what would have been his 90th birthday, at his home in Bell Canyon, California.[5]

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